Fernando Botero

Biography

Fernando Botero

b. 1932, Columbia

Fernando Botero Angulo is a Colombian figurative artist. His works feature a figurative style, called by some “Boterismo”, which gives them an unmistakable identity. Botero depicts women, men, daily life, historical events and characters, milestones of art, still-life, animals and the natural world in general, with exaggerated and disproportionate volumetry, accompanied by fine details of scathing criticism, irony, humor, and ingenuity.

Self-titled “the most Colombian of Colombian artists” early on, he came to national prominence when he won the first prize at the Salon des artistas Colombianos in 1958. Working most of the year in Paris, in the last three decades he has achieved international recognition for his paintings, drawings and sculpture, with exhibitions across the world.[His art is collected by major museums, corporations and private collectors.

From 1949 to 1950, Botero worked as a set designer, before moving to Bogota in 1951. His first one-man show was held at the Galería Leo Matiz in Bogotá, a few months after his arrival. In 1952, Botero travelled with a group of artists to Barcelona, where he stayed briefly before moving on to Madrid

Botero’s work was first exhibited in 1948, in a group show along with other artists from the region

In Madrid, Botero studied at the Academia de San BernardoIn 1952, he traveled to Bogotá, where he had a solo exhibit at the Leo Matiz gallery.

In 1953, Botero moved to Paris, where he spent most of his time in the Louvre , studying the works there. He lived in Florence Italy from 1953 to 1954, studying the works of Renaissance masters. In recent decades, he has lived most of the time in Paris, but spends one month a year in his native city of Medellín. He has had more than 50 exhibits in major cities worldwide, and his work commands selling prices in the millions of dollars. In 1958, he won the ninth edition of the salon Des Artistas Colombianos.

Botero is an abstract artist in the most fundamental sense, choosing colors, shapes, and proportions based on intuitive aestethic thinking. Though he spends only one month a year in Colombia, he considers himself the “most Colombian artist living” due to his insulation from the international trends of the art world.

In 2004 Botero exhibited a series of 27 drawings and 23 paintings dealing with the violence in Colombia from the drug cartels. He donated the works to theNational Museum of Colombia, where they were first exhibited.